A walk around Durham

One reaches the historic part of Durham by crossing a bridge over River Wear. Local legend has it that a group of monks searching for a safe place to settle and rebury St. Cuthbert came across this tiny peninsula following a turn of events that involved St. Cuthbert’s bier, a monk’s dream and a milkmaid searching for her lost cow. The 11th century cathedral is the result of this settlement of monks and houses the shrine of St. Cuthbert.

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During an april weekend last year, I visited this UNESCO heritage site for a Chevening scholar conference at Durham University. I decided to stay the night in the historic part of the city at St. Chad’s College, one of the oldest and smallest colleges of Durham University, so that I could explore the city beyond the university premises. The row of townhouses that make up the college overlook the cathedral.

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The weekend of my visit coincidentally happened to be a heritage weekend due to which there were several free events and tours taking place around the old city in addition to free entry in museums. I went on the cathedral tour and the castle tour as well as explored the Museum of Archaeology at the Palace green library premises. Photography was not permitted within any of the premises. The Undercroft restaurant at the Durham cathedral was a refreshing stop for some tea in-between the tours.

The 11th century castle, whose construction was undertaken on the order of William the Conqueror, has been home to students of University College, Durham University, since 1840.

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What I enjoyed best about my stay in Durham was the early morning walk I took around parts of the historic city. With hardly anyone on the road and the morning mist swirling around me, it was easy to imagine that I was back in time and could expect to come across a medieval resident at the next turn in the path.

Let me take you on a photo tour of my special morning walk.

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I hope you enjoyed the photo tour around the cathedral!

[I am linking this post to City Tripping #52]

MummyTravels
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22 thoughts on “A walk around Durham

  1. I love when work conferences turn into a mini vacation! You certainly had a beautiful destination to explore! Although for some reason, I find the mist/fog in your pictures add a bit of an eerie feeling as the streets are empty, but still very beautiful! #CityTripping

    Liked by 1 person

    • Durham is a beautiful place and I was happy that the weather was great on both days that I was there. Yes, I agree the early morning mist/fog kind of seems to blur time and it felt like I might have traveled back in time 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I think the conference organizers probably timed the dates of the conference with the heritage weekend but forgot to inform participants. So, most had either stayed the day prior to the conference or left that evening. I was lucky to have decided to stay a day after so happened upon the heritage weekend events.

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  2. The mist makes it look incredibly atmospheric. I haven’t been to Durham in years, must revisit as I don’t think I had a good look at the castle – so much history in one place. Thanks for linking #citytripping

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Such atmospheric photos – I love seeing your early morning walks and how you manage to combine those work trips with exploring. Durham is another of those UK cities that I haven’t visited for far too long, and the cathedral is so beautiful. Thanks for linking up with #citytripping

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Cathy. I really enjoyed exploring a tiny part of Durham and was glad that the conference had been held there because I probably would not have visited it otherwise.

      Like

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